Thoughts on climbing and training

Overtraining in climbers: what it is, how to spot it, and how to deal with it

“Overtraining” is a phrase thrown around vaguely in the climbing world, just like “training.” It reminds me a bit of that scene in This is the End, where anything that’s bad falls under the umbrella of gluten. Can’t easily crank out a one-arm after two sessions of weighted pull-ups? Feeling overtrained. Didn’t send your projContinue reading “Overtraining in climbers: what it is, how to spot it, and how to deal with it”

Finger strength testing philosophy & update from 4 months of training

Athlete testing for rock climbing is still a brand new, evolving concept. I’ve spent the last few months testing myself and my 1-on-1 clients and putting together data sets. This is a short list of key points to consider when embarking on a testing regimen. What is testing good for? Testing is good for someContinue reading “Finger strength testing philosophy & update from 4 months of training”

Free kettlebell & climbing strength program: The Wolf Pup

This 6-week block based on Geoff Neupert’s Wolf program should be a good challenge for an athlete who is familiar with kettlebells and training for climbing. It is not a climbing-strength-specific program, but rather a general preparatory phase. This means it would be ideal for use in an off-season, like during bad weather, or duringContinue reading “Free kettlebell & climbing strength program: The Wolf Pup”

A self-coached climber’s guide: Questions to ask yourself before you start a new training plan

One of the most frequent questions asked on climbing forums around the internet is some form of “hey, I need feedback on my training plan.” Usually, these climbers are self-coached. The plans run the gamut from “meticulously collected from respectable, vital training books” to “do every drill I could find on the internet every dayContinue reading “A self-coached climber’s guide: Questions to ask yourself before you start a new training plan”

Managing arousal levels, and matching arousal to imposed demand

Climbing makes many different demands of us. We need to be able to speed ourselves up, then slow ourselves down. Try extra hard, then be incredibly gentle. Focus on what we’re doing in this section, but also notice footholds for the next section, and sometimes go fully out-of-body to circumvent pain and fear. This setContinue reading “Managing arousal levels, and matching arousal to imposed demand”

Bouldering 101: How to place crash pads and not break your legs

I’ve had the unfortunate experience of witnessing many bouldering injuries. These range from nauseatingly audible pulley pops to countless ankle sprains to seeing someone break her back falling off an icy boulder in Wyoming. My least favorite memories are the accidents or near-accidents that were clearly avoidable. Usually those went something like this: some folksContinue reading “Bouldering 101: How to place crash pads and not break your legs”

Loading…

Something went wrong. Please refresh the page and/or try again.